Cataract Surgery and You.

Our eyes allow us to experience such beauty and wonder. Unfortunately, many people will be affected by an eye disease in their lifetime. This is why wellness is essential.

Wellness involves maintaining a healthy set of eyes. We achieve this through preventive care. What is preventive care? Investopedia defines preventive services as routine health care that includes check-ups, patient counseling and screenings to prevent illness, disease, and other health-related problems.

Your health is worthy of attention and managing or neglecting it has serious consequences. In today’s note, I explore a common eye disease known as cataracts. It is important to shed light on its impact on eye health. Furthermore, I would like to share the approaches, alternatives, and mental preparation that comes with cataract surgery. Hopefully it will be a helpful and inspiring read.

~What is a cataract?~

Let’s begin with the definition of cataract. A cataract is a clouding of the eye’s natural lens, which lies behind the iris and the pupil. It starts out small and at first has little effect on your vision. Ultimately, it has the ability to impact your eye health.

Cataracts are the most common cause of vision loss in people over age 40 and is the principal cause of blindness in the world. There are three common types of cataracts. You have subcapsular, nuclear, and cortical cataracts.

Each type is identified by its location and development in the eye. They all require treatment.

~Approach~

Cataract Surgery is available in the form of laser and manual. It is a simple outpatient procedure that is performed after counseling. There are two approaches to the surgery: traditional and laser assisted.

Please be sure to ask any questions during the counseling process. It is important that all concerns are addressed to ensure you are knowledgeable of the procedure and certain of the risks involved.

~Alternative~

Lutein and zeaxanthin are two antioxidants – belonging to the class of carotenoids.

Given their accumulation in the retina, the role L/Z play in eye health has been investigated with a particular focus on how consumption of these carotenoids may prevent and/or slow the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in older adults.

Additionally, I would like to mention the role Vitamin C is said to have in reducing the risk of cataracts, vision loss, and macular degeneration.

Consider foods high in vitamin C and/or add a vitamin C supplement.

Consult a health care professional before taking supplements.

~Mental Preparation~

Before you make the decision to consider surgery, be certain.

– Level of neccesity

– Cost

– Recovery (both emotional & physical)

Speaking from personal experience, I was hesitant to go through with the surgery.

I wore corrective lenses from the time I was a year old. From the time I could move around on my own, I walked into things. If it wasn’t directly in my face, I couldn’t see it.

I saw blurred images. It was like my own personal world. I had moments of frustration and I wondered what it was like to see without corrective lenses. But as time went on, I made peace with myself and what I was given.

I had mixed emotions with pursuing surgery because I was told it would do little good and the risk was still present.

I decided to have surgery on both eyes.

It was a physical adjustment that took place but emotionally I had to make sense of this new world.

This new world provides a greater level of independence in my daily living and self care.

I am learning to be open to opportunities I never thought existed.

And that is my note.

Thank you for your ears.

Be well.

~Reference~

https://www.investopedia.com

http://www.allaboutvision.com/conditions/cataracts.htm

https://www.davisvision.com

https://www.drdavidwilliams.com/how-to-eliminate-cataracts

http://yoursightmatters.com/traditional-cataract-surgery-vs-laser-assisted-cataract-surgery/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

2 thoughts on “Cataract Surgery and You.

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